Application integration Definitions

  • C

    cloud service governance

    Cloud services governance is a general term for applying specific policies or principles to the use of cloud computing services. The goal of cloud services governance is to secure applications and data when they are located remotely.

  • D

    data source object (DSO)

    A data source object (DSO) is a Microsoft ActiveX object embedded within a Web page. It employs a process called data binding, in which an ActiveX control communicates directly with another Web page, or with an external XML data source.

  • E

    EAI (enterprise application integration)

    Enterprise application integration (EAI) is the task of uniting the databases and workflows associated with business applications to ensure that the business uses the information consistently and that changes to core business data made by one application are correctly reflected in others.

  • explicit parallelism

    Explicit parallelism is a concept of processor-compiler efficiency in which a group of instructions is sent from the compiler to the processor for simultaneous rather than sequential execution.

  • I

    IDEF (Integrated Definition)

    IDEF (for Integrated Definition) is a group of modeling methods that can be used to describe operations in an enterprise.

  • interoperability

    Interoperability (pronounced IHN-tuhr-AHP-uhr-uh-BIHL-ih-tee) is the ability of different systems, devices, applications or products to connect and communicate in a coordinated way, without effort from the end user.

  • M

    Maven

    Maven is an Apache Software Foundation build tool for project management that automates Java projects.

  • message queueing

    In programming, message queueing is a method by which process (or program instances) can exchange or pass data using an interface to a system-managed queue of messages.

  • middleware

    Middleware is the software that connects network-based requests generated by a client to the back-end data the client is requesting.

  • O

    object

    In object-oriented programming (OOP), objects are the things you think about first in designing a program and they are also the units of code that are eventually derived from the process.

  • Object Management Group (OMG)

    The OMG (Object Management Group) was formed in 1989 by a group of vendors for the purpose of creating a standard architecture for distributed objects (also known as "components") in networks.

  • Object Request Broker (ORB)

    Also see ORBS, a term easily confused with ORB. In Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA), an Object Request Broker (ORB) is the programming that acts as a "broker" between a client request for a service from a distributed object or component and the completion of that request.

  • object-oriented programming (OOP)

    Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a programming language model where programs are organized around data, or objects, rather than functions and logic.

  • Open Grid Services Architecture (OGSA)

    The Open Grid Services Architecture (OGSA) is a set of standards defining the way in which information is shared among diverse components of large, heterogeneous grid systems.

  • P

    polyglot persistence

    Polyglot persistence is an enterprise storage term used to describe choosing different data storage/data stores technologies to support the various data types and their storage needs.

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