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Web services expert predictions 2004 -- Daniel Foody, Web services deployments

Once again, our knowledgeable Web services experts are offering their predictions for the coming year. How accurate were last year's predictions? Check them out here. Then, see what they've predicted for the world of Web services in 2004 below.


Once again, our knowledgeable Web services experts are offering their predictions for the coming year. How accurate were last year's predictions? Check them out here. Then, see what they've predicted for the world of Web services in 2004 below.

Look into your own crystal ball and tell us what you see for the Web services world in 2004. Post your predictions in our Sound Off feature.


Kerry Champion, Middleware
Ben Watson, Standards
Daniel Foody, Web services deployments
Eric Marks, author, Executive's Guide to Web Services
Sean McGrath, XML
Mark Baker, REST
Doron Sherman, Web services orchestration
Roman Stanek, Future of Web services
Jeff Hanson, Java/J2EE

 


Daniel Foody
Daniel Foody
As chief technology officer at Actional, Dan Foody leverages his extensive hands-on experience in enterprise systems integration software toward easing integration through Web services. He is an active participant in the Web services standards community, including WS-I and OASIS, where he spearheads Actional's contributions on the OASIS Management Protocol Technical Committee and its efforts to deliver XML-based Web services management standards. Dan's experience with application integration technologies including middleware, platform and Web services, gives him a broad knowledge of the intricacies of systems such as SAP R/3, DCOM, CORBA and Java. He is the author of various application integration standards and contributed significantly to the OMG standard for COM/CORBA interworking. Dan holds both a BS and MS in Electrical Engineering from Cornell University.
Ask Dan a question about Web services deployments .

Dan's 2004 predictions

  • Web services security (WSS) standards will become standard functionality of any competitive Web services implementation.

  • When purchasing applications, 2004 will be the year when "Web services support" moves from nice-to-have to must-have on customer's checklists. Vendors that lag in this support will be eliminated up front.

  • Despite hopes to the contrary, widely adopted standards for reliable delivery over Web services will not emerge until, at best, late in 2004.

  • In the continuing paradox of Web services:
    - People will continue to say that HTTP is not a suitable network protocol for Web services.
    - HTTP will continue to be the network protocol of choice for Web services.

  • In at least one well publicized break-in, the credit card numbers of thousands of individuals will be stolen by criminals that take advantage of XML-level security flaws in a major Internet merchant's Web services.

  • When the PlayStation 3 arrives just in time for the 2004 holiday season, it will only be available in limited quantities. To not miss the opportunity, people will build automated "bots" that use Web services to constantly hit Amazon.com in order to buy the first PS3 the second it becomes available. The massive load generated by these Web service bots will nearly bring Amazon.com down.

  • Due to the critical nature of Web service deployments in 2004, Web services management will become a Fortune 1000 IT budget line item.

>> Click here for more expert predictions.

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